High Country Gardens on February 14th, 2014

Salvia (commonly referred to as ‘Sage’) represents a huge family of flowers that live across much of our planet. Naturally, given their wide range of habitats, these plants attract a variety of pollinators to their nectar rich flowers.  I like to divide them into two main regional groups as a handy way to understand the […]

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How do you pronounce the Latin genus known as Agastache?  In Colorado and New Mexico, where we can grow a wide variety of these wonderful perennials, we generally say the name as A gas tä key, A gas tā key or A gas tä key. I’ve also heard it spoken as A ga stash ē […]

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High Country Gardens on December 27th, 2013

Each year, the National Gardening Bureau selects a perennial to be named as the “Perennial of the Year.” For 2014 they have chosen Echinacea to be the featured perennial. The genus Echinacea (The Purple Coneflowers) is a family of North American wildflowers that have long been appreciated for their beautiful flowers, value to pollinators and […]

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High Country Gardens on December 20th, 2013

As a kid I loved to buy the paint-by-numbers watercolor painting kits. I wasn’t a very talented artist but my canvases turned out pretty nicely and I was happy and encouraged to do more.  So many years ago, when I first though about offering  our High Country customers a way to plant a professionally designed […]

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High Country Gardens on December 6th, 2013

New Salvia Varieties from High Country Gardens for Spring 2014   The genus Salvia, commonly referred to as Sage, is vast, with hundreds of species worldwide. They are tough, durable plants with colorful flowers, aromatic foliage and invaluable as a nectar source for all types of pollinators. And for waterwise landscapes in the US, there […]

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High Country Gardens on November 22nd, 2013

New!  High Country Garden 2014 Plant of the Year It is interesting to note how some really great plants seem to hang around my greenhouse and gardens for a long time before I get around to introducing them.  And I’m not sure why I keep them to myself, but this is certainly the case with […]

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High Country Gardens on November 15th, 2013

The disappearing pollinator population is a phenomenon that affects our ecosystem in a huge way. Many know that the dwindling population is a problem, but few realize that gardeners can help pollinators in a BIG way, simply by planting a wildflower or perennial garden!  What are Pollinators’ jobs in nature? There are a variety of […]

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David Salman on February 26th, 2010
This entry is part 2 of 2 in the series The Genus Penstemon; The Royalty of American Wildflowers

This entry is part 2 of 2 in the series The Genus Penstemon; The Royalty of American Wildflowers Recommended Varieties I have numerous favorites amongst the 300 or so species of Beardtongues. Admittedly, my favorites are well adapted to the high desert/intermountain region in which I garden. These plants all thrive in cold zone 6 […]

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David Salman on February 19th, 2010
This entry is part 1 of 2 in the series The Genus Penstemon; The Royalty of American Wildflowers

This entry is part 1 of 2 in the series The Genus Penstemon; The Royalty of American Wildflowers Overview of the Genus Penstemon, commonly known as Beardtongues are among our most beautiful and varied group of our North American wildflowers. Unique to North America, only one species of over 300 is found outside of our […]

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David Salman on September 8th, 2009

One of my favorite native genera is Zauschneria, also know by its common names such as Hummingbird Trumpet, Fire Chalice and California Fuchsia. (To botanists and botanically informed gardeners who read this blog, you’ll note that I have refused to lump them into the Fireweed genus Epilobium) Share on Facebook

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