David Salman on February 26th, 2010
This entry is part 2 of 2 in the series The Genus Penstemon; The Royalty of American Wildflowers

This entry is part 2 of 2 in the series The Genus Penstemon; The Royalty of American Wildflowers Recommended Varieties I have numerous favorites amongst the 300 or so species of Beardtongues. Admittedly, my favorites are well adapted to the high desert/intermountain region in which I garden. These plants all thrive in cold zone 6 […]

Continue reading about The Genus Penstemon; The Royalty of American Wildflowers (Part 2)

David Salman on February 19th, 2010
This entry is part 1 of 2 in the series The Genus Penstemon; The Royalty of American Wildflowers

This entry is part 1 of 2 in the series The Genus Penstemon; The Royalty of American Wildflowers Overview of the Genus Penstemon, commonly known as Beardtongues are among our most beautiful and varied group of our North American wildflowers. Unique to North America, only one species of over 300 is found outside of our […]

Continue reading about The Genus Penstemon; The Royalty of American Wildflowers (Part 1)

High Country Gardens on February 17th, 2010

2011 Dates JANUARY 22, 2011 David will be presenting: “Ornamental Grasses and Perennials: Beautiful Plantings for Birds, Bees, and Butterflies” in the City of Fort Collins, CO Undaunted Gardens event. FEBRUARY 4 & 5 David will be speaking at the Peak to Prairie Landscape Symposium. The topic for Friday 2/4 will be ‘Rock Gardening with […]

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David Salman on February 12th, 2010

Traditionally, we think of the balmy days of spring or summer as the time to sow seeds in our gardens. And while this may be true of many annual flowers and vegetables, seeds of perennial wildflowers are best sow in the late fall or winter! Why? Many perennials have seeds that require a period of […]

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David Salman on February 5th, 2010

Agave (century plants) are in the top tier of my favorite plants. I enjoy them for their incredible geometric symmetry, their ornamental yet fearsome spination and the remarkable impact their sculptural forms have on the landscape, especially the larger growing species. Share on Facebook

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