High Country Gardens on January 31st, 2014

There are many styles of rock gardening. Europeans were the first to develop rock gardening as a way to mimic the Alps and other European mountain ranges and plant them with alpine plants, and this style of rock gardening remains extremely popular here and across “the Pond.”  But rock gardening has evolved and reflects an […]

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High Country Gardens on January 3rd, 2014

My love of Lavender has been with me for many years and is only getting stronger as I continue to propagate, plant and enjoy this wonderful herb from the Old World.  Lavender, like olives, apples and grapes, has thousands of years of history co-existing with mankind. It is a horticultural treasure that continues to serve […]

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High Country Gardens on December 27th, 2013

Each year, the National Gardening Bureau selects a perennial to be named as the “Perennial of the Year.” For 2014 they have chosen Echinacea to be the featured perennial. The genus Echinacea (The Purple Coneflowers) is a family of North American wildflowers that have long been appreciated for their beautiful flowers, value to pollinators and […]

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High Country Gardens on December 20th, 2013

As a kid I loved to buy the paint-by-numbers watercolor painting kits. I wasn’t a very talented artist but my canvases turned out pretty nicely and I was happy and encouraged to do more.  So many years ago, when I first though about offering  our High Country customers a way to plant a professionally designed […]

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High Country Gardens on December 13th, 2013

Where I found it I spend a lot of time driving between my home in Santa Fe and Denver, the Intermountain West’s horticultural epicenter. One summer on my way north, just over the border of Colorado, I spotted a huge field of Zinnia grandiflora in full bloom. I stopped to investigate and to my delight […]

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High Country Gardens on December 6th, 2013

New Salvia Varieties from High Country Gardens for Spring 2014   The genus Salvia, commonly referred to as Sage, is vast, with hundreds of species worldwide. They are tough, durable plants with colorful flowers, aromatic foliage and invaluable as a nectar source for all types of pollinators. And for waterwise landscapes in the US, there […]

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High Country Gardens on November 22nd, 2013

New!  High Country Garden 2014 Plant of the Year It is interesting to note how some really great plants seem to hang around my greenhouse and gardens for a long time before I get around to introducing them.  And I’m not sure why I keep them to myself, but this is certainly the case with […]

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High Country Gardens on November 13th, 2013

Now that fall is officially here (September 22nd, 2013 was the Fall Equinox), and your landscape plants are dropping their leaves, this is a great time to take a stroll through your yard because it’s easier to see the details.  Fill up a mug of hot tea (or grab a bottle of beer) and take […]

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High Country Gardens on October 18th, 2013

  Sedum, commonly known as stonecrop, is a group of succulent plants native across much of the Northern Hemisphere.  They are excellent garden plants because they are: Waterwise and cold hardy Colorful with flowers in shades of pink, white and yellow Excellent for fall and winter interest with their ornamental seed heads A favorite of […]

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High Country Gardens on September 13th, 2013

Fall is upon us with the Autumn Solstice less than two weeks away. By establishing your native plants in the fall, they will be larger and bloom more robustly during next year’s growing season than the same plant planted next spring. For gardeners in USDA zones 7 through 11 where the summers are hot and […]

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